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#1 Emza

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 04:31 PM

I adore these books but an ickle thing that I find irritating, Nora Roberts gets the Irish and English mixed up!! :blink:

We do not nor have we ever said the words BUGGER or Dog's Bolocks (We have far more colourful methods of swearing lol :lol:)

Ready is an english way of saying money. And I have to say her Irish is extremely messy. NO OFFENCE NORA!!!!! Lol


I've noticed she in a small way associates Irish with red hair.... Sorry Lads, but red hair is NOT an irish thing. Most Irish have brown hair and blue or Grey eyes!!!!

Roarke is more an English name. O'Roarke would be how we'd say it...


Still love her books though!! lol

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#2 Shayde

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 06:25 PM

I adore these books but an ickle thing that I find irritating, Nora Roberts gets the Irish and English mixed up!! :blink:

We do not nor have we ever said the words BUGGER or Dog's Bolocks (We have far more colourful methods of swearing lol :lol:)

Ready is an english way of saying money. And I have to say her Irish is extremely messy. NO OFFENCE NORA!!!!! Lol


I've noticed she in a small way associates Irish with red hair.... Sorry Lads, but red hair is NOT an irish thing. Most Irish have brown hair and blue or Grey eyes!!!!

Roarke is more an English name. O'Roarke would be how we'd say it...


Still love her books though!! lol

later

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Oh, I don't know! A few Irish chaps of my aqqaintance do use some of the above words in their conversation! :blink:

Mark you, "ready" or "readies" meaning cash is more toward England than Ireland granted, but "bollocks" seems to be universal across the British isles. But then again, using "dog's bollocks" is less of an insult more used as a term denoting a good thing, as in: "That's the dog's bollocks!" While using "bollocks" not "bullocks" is more a swear word.


As for red hair, that's more in my area. Well, less red more ginger!
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#3 Joe

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 06:56 PM

Well, I think most Americans associate red hair with "Irish". There are many Irish Americans who have red hair (Nora herself being one, another Conan O'Brian, James Caan another...). Though I wouldn't say that Nora really associates red hair with Irish, as I can't think of a single one of her Irish heroes who have red hair (Rogan, Murphy, Roarke, Mal, Gideon, Aidan, Shawn...all dark haired. Aidan being the closest one to red being described as "Chestnut", which is dark brown with red-ish highlights). Granted, many of her Irish heroines are red-heads, but I don't think that's necessarily because they are Irish. :dunno:

I've never once seen Roarke say "Dog's Bolocks" in the books. :lol: He uses bollocks quite often, but never the other. ;)

You guys don't say Bugger? :confused: Huh. Learn something new every day. :lol: I've seen Pierce Brosnan use bugger in interviews, but he's lived in both Ireland (he's a born Irishman) and England, so maybe that's why. I know a girl from another board who's from Dublin, and she uses the term "bugger" quite often in her posts. Could be the influence of the books though. :P

Could it possibly be a regional thing? I'm from the Northern mid-west of the USA, and the movie Fargo sort of showed our "accent" to the rest of the world. :lol: However, I can assure you, that while we DO have that accent, and we do use some of the phrases from that movie ("You Betcha" being the major one. ;)), it's not NEARLY as exaggerated as that. And also, we (and also the Canadians), I can assure you, do NOT use "Eh?" after every sentence. :P There's certain places that we use it.

Also, I guess maybe I'm projecting a bit, as I can't claim to actually "know" any Irish individuals unless they're Americans with Irish heritage, other than the one girl from the other board, and now you. :lol: But could it possibly be that the vernacular is because this series is set in the future? :dunno: I guess I don't see the "terms" that you say aren't really Irish all that much in her books that are set in the present. Though Cian does use "bugger" and "bollocks" a few times, but he's a Vampire who's lived everywhere in his 1,000 years. :lol:

I'm not sure about the name, as again, things may have changed in the future (the whole Urban Wars thing), but I know that here in the states, names were changed for the simple fact of keeping easier records. But I've never had a problem with there not being an "O" in front of Roarke. Roarke sounds pretty Irish to me. My Grandfather being an Englishman/Scotsman with the name of "Jackson", I've always found Roarke to sound exotic like I imagine Ireland to be.

I guess what I'm saying is that Nora's an American. Yes, she has Irish heritage, but she's still an American. She writes, mostly, for an American audience. The things that "bother" you (and believe me, I completely understand it :)), are things that most Americans believe to be part of the Irish "mystique" if that makes sense at all. She's paying serious homage to her heritage and your country. I've always thought it was pretty cool. :)

#4 larsonkoala2

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 07:13 PM

to me the generalization of a redhead being irish is a bit off. if i am irish that is news to my polish, urkriane and latvian grandparents. :lol: and i do have the fair skin and hazel eyes to go along with the package.



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#5 Shayde

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 07:24 PM

You guys don't say Bugger? :confused: Huh. Learn something new every day. :lol: I've seen Pierce Brosnan use bugger in interviews, but he's lived in both Ireland (he's a born Irishman) and England, so maybe that's why. I know a girl from another board who's from Dublin, and she uses the term "bugger" quite often in her posts. Could be the influence of the books though. :P
....................

Could it possibly be a regional thing?



"Bugger" is used, as I said above, pretty much across Britain as I'm aware. Used to denote annoyance, despair, and at times being totally peed off at the way things are! There are regional differences of course, but that's a given!

See? Once again InDeath.net is being educational. Showing you how we in Britain swear...
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#6 Joe

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 07:30 PM



You guys don't say Bugger? :confused: Huh. Learn something new every day. :lol: I've seen Pierce Brosnan use bugger in interviews, but he's lived in both Ireland (he's a born Irishman) and England, so maybe that's why. I know a girl from another board who's from Dublin, and she uses the term "bugger" quite often in her posts. Could be the influence of the books though. :P
....................

Could it possibly be a regional thing?



"Bugger" is used, as I said above, pretty much across Britain as I'm aware. Used to denote annoyance, despair, and at times being totally peed off at the way things are! There are regional differences of course, but that's a given!

See? Once again InDeath.net is being educational. Showing you how we in Britain swear...

:lol: Greg, I think we were replying at the same time, as I saw you had entered yours when I posted. :) So yeah, I get that. Like I said, might be a regional thing. I've heard lots of people from the British Isles (including Ireland) use the word "bugger" in interviews, and the person I mentioned from the other board (whom I'm not very fond of, but that has nothing to do with her geography. She's just not a very nice person. :P) so I completely believe that.

to me the generalization of a redhead being irish is a bit off. if i am irish that is news to my polish, urkriane and latvian grandparents. :lol: and i do have the fair skin and hazel eyes to go along with the package.
nancy

That's sort of like my dad, Nancy, who was blonde until he was around 10 and then started to darken. His hair is nearly black now. ;) He's Frisian Dutch (which BTW, is another American "assumption", that all Dutch are blondes). He's of Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, French and Austrian descent. ;) So yeah, you'd think BLONDE. Nope, he has two brothers who are blonde, and my grandfather is blonde. The rest are dark haired.

Same goes for my mom, who's half Danish, and half English/Scottish. Her hair is lighter than dad's, but it's still a brunette (even reddish, some may say ;)) shade.

I'm Blonde, but that's pretty much due to my love for Garnier Nutrisse and the fact that I look much better as a blonde than I do as any other color (was blonde all my life, and when I started to darken a bit, at 22 or so, I flipped and kept it the way it was). :lol: Nick and Dan are still "sort of" blonde (very light brunette). It's hard to be a true blonde anymore, unfortunately. ;)

#7 WickedWitchOfTheWest

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 07:33 PM

I obviously haven't met enough Englishmen because I don't remember anyone saying bugger around me. :unsure:
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#8 AJ

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 07:37 PM

I guess what I'm saying is that Nora's an American. Yes, she has Irish heritage, but she's still an American. She writes, mostly, for an American audience. The things that "bother" you (and believe me, I completely understand it :)), are things that most Americans believe to be part of the Irish "mystique" if that makes sense at all. She's paying serious homage to her heritage and your country. I've always thought it was pretty cool. :)


Well, yes and no...yes, Nora's American, but she's not completely ignorant to the Irish culture. You also have to mention that Nora has been to Ireland numerous times, and even owns property there. I imagine she has heard many native Irishmen talk, and I can only assume that she gets a lot of her dialogue from those travels to Ireland. I wouldn't imagine that she would be so careless as to use words and phrases that people don't really use there at all.

The problem I have is in people saying "We never do this" or "we never say that" because, maybe YOU don't, maybe nobody you know does, but that doesn't mean nobody does, period. As Shayde said, many of his Irish friends use those words, and you could probably look through Irish websites and forums and see those words used, too.

Same with the name Roarke. You can't say "We would say it O'Roarke" since there ARE people in Ireland with the last name Roarke. Many? I don't know. I haven't seen an Irish phone book recently, but you can search through Irish newspapers online and see that name pop up.

As to red hair, I found this little article on the "Irish Voice Newspaper" site which is a part of IrishAbroad.com:

THE future is bleak for the Irish colleen say experts this week – with the extinction of redheads in 100 years. Ireland’s 320,000 natural redheads are the last of a dying breed according to scientists who say in a special report this week that too few people are now carrying the red hair gene for it to survive.

Ireland, because it has one of the highest percentage of redheads per head of population in the world, will prove to be the last place in the world to have redheads.

Red hair, say scientists in a report by the Oxford Hair Foundation, is in retreat because a maximum of just 4% of the world’s population carry the gene.

Because the gene is recessive, it is diluted whenever carriers of the gene have children with people who have the stronger brown hair gene.

Dr. John Gray of the Oxford Hair Foundation said black and brown haired people are wiping out the red hair gene.

“The way things are going red hair will either be extremely rare or extinct by the end of the century,” he said.



So there you go. I'm sure that, like Joe says, because Nora is American and writing for Americans, that can explain some discrepancies, but I don't know that you can say "We never" for most of them.

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#9 Joe

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 07:54 PM


I guess what I'm saying is that Nora's an American. Yes, she has Irish heritage, but she's still an American. She writes, mostly, for an American audience. The things that "bother" you (and believe me, I completely understand it :)), are things that most Americans believe to be part of the Irish "mystique" if that makes sense at all. She's paying serious homage to her heritage and your country. I've always thought it was pretty cool. :)


Well, yes and no...yes, Nora's American, but she's not completely ignorant to the Irish culture. You also have to mention that Nora has been to Ireland numerous times, and even owns property there. I imagine she has heard many native Irishmen talk, and I can only assume that she gets a lot of her dialogue from those travels to Ireland. I wouldn't imagine that she would be so careless as to use words and phrases that people don't really use there at all.

The problem I have is in people saying "We never do this" or "we never say that" because, maybe YOU don't, maybe nobody you know does, but that doesn't mean nobody does, period. As Shayde said, many of his Irish friends use those words, and you could probably look through Irish websites and forums and see those words used, too.

Same with the name Roarke. You can't say "We would say it O'Roarke" since there ARE people in Ireland with the last name Roarke. Many? I don't know. I haven't seen an Irish phone book recently, but you can search through Irish newspapers online and see that name pop up.

:lol: I agree. Though Nora had only taken her first "sojourn" to Ireland shortly before she wrote her first Irish Trilogy (Born In), and right before she began the In Death series. But I totally agree. I was just tryin' to be nice. ;) I didn't mean that she is AT ALL ignorant to the Irish Culture or their way of speaking, because you're completely right. She HAS been there numerous times, has property there, and does know the Irish "culture" in a way I never will, even if I travel to Ireland, which I plan to do at some point.

I totally understand, too, that whole "we never" or "I never" thing. Completely correct. Sometimes we don't realize how we speak. I was SHOCKED when I first met people from other parts of the country who told me they "liked my accent". ;) I swore we talked just like everyone else in the United States. :lol: Yeah, now I realize? Not so much.

As to red hair, I found this little article on the "Irish Voice Newspaper" site which is a part of IrishAbroad.com:

THE future is bleak for the Irish colleen say experts this week – with the extinction of redheads in 100 years. Ireland’s 320,000 natural redheads are the last of a dying breed according to scientists who say in a special report this week that too few people are now carrying the red hair gene for it to survive.

Ireland, because it has one of the highest percentage of redheads per head of population in the world, will prove to be the last place in the world to have redheads.

Red hair, say scientists in a report by the Oxford Hair Foundation, is in retreat because a maximum of just 4% of the world’s population carry the gene.

Because the gene is recessive, it is diluted whenever carriers of the gene have children with people who have the stronger brown hair gene.

Dr. John Gray of the Oxford Hair Foundation said black and brown haired people are wiping out the red hair gene.

“The way things are going red hair will either be extremely rare or extinct by the end of the century,” he said.



So there you go. I'm sure that, like Joe says, because Nora is American and writing for Americans, that can explain some discrepancies, but I don't know that you can say "We never" for most of them.

AJ

Yeah, there was a similar study that they did for blonde hair. Norweigens have the highest percentage, and they figure that TRUE blondes will be extinct within the next 20 years. I've only met a few TRUE blondes in my entire life. I've met several TRUE redheads. Take from that what you will. :lol:

#10 AJ

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 08:26 PM

I've actually read studies that say that it's possible that in a few hundred years, all people on earth will be "mixed race" and that there may be no "races" at all. Everyone will pretty much look the same: brown skin, dark hair and dark eyes.

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#11 Celestical

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 08:33 PM

What exactly are true blondes? People who were born with blonde hair and kept it as they grew older? Or just anyone born with blonde hair, regardless of whether it darkens as they age or not?
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#12 Joe

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 08:37 PM

Not shocking. Especially in the states. I've read similar studies, and I'm not sure I agree. But I certainly don't think that certain "races" will look the same AT ALL. As I said before, according to MY race, I should be a fair skinned blonde. Instead, I'm a bottle blonde (though I'd still be blonde by anyone else's standards if I didn't dye my hair. :lol:), with medium skin that tans really well. It just depends on where the "mating" lies. I consider "mixed race" as a black and white "mix" (I could completely be wrong though), and as far as I'm concerned, I think that's pretty funny. I know SEVERAL "mixed race" people right now. I have several friends who are "half black/half "white"". ;) I guess it depends on what you consider a "race". :dunno: It's just interesting to me.

The whole "race" and "heritage" thing is really interesting to me, mostly because my dad is so into it. He's traced our family back to it's arrival in the US, and has actually learned to speak Frishe (again, a derivative of Dutch...but he'd never admit that so don't tell him I said so :lol:). I'm only second generation Danish (my Grandmother walked off the boat from Denmark, so I mostly consider myself a Dane..I'm pretty proud of that. Just don't tell my dad. ;)). Joe is German and Dutch (actual Dutch, not Frisian. :lol:), with a tiny little bit of Spanish thrown in. I just think the whole thing is fun, in the USA, because so many of us are complete "mutts". :lol:

#13 Joe

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 08:43 PM

What exactly are true blondes? People who were born with blonde hair and kept it as they grew older? Or just anyone born with blonde hair, regardless of whether it darkens as they age or not?

A "true blonde" scientifically, is someone who stays blonde all of their lives. ALL of the rest of their *ahem* hair is blonde as well. :blush: (I think you know what I'm saying. ;)). My Grandfather is an example of a "true blonde". He's was blonde until about ten years ago when he started to go gray (I know NOTHING about the other deal. :lol: I just know he never dyed his hair. :P). As I said, my parents were both "born" blonde, as were all of us kids. My dad's hair was nearly black when he married my mom. My mom's hair was brunette/red by the time she was a teenager. I stayed blonde until my sophomore year in college before I started to darken. Both of my brothers were the same. Dan and I (again, without the bottle, I would have darkened) have darkened more than Nick, who I would classify as a "true blonde". His hair is "sandy blonde", but it's never darkened to the point of being a brunette. And again, I have no idea about the "other". I just know that he's still blonde on his head and his legs. ;)

#14 AJ

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 09:34 PM

I consider "mixed race" as a black and white "mix" (I could completely be wrong though), and as far as I'm concerned, I think that's pretty funny. I know SEVERAL "mixed race" people right now. I have several friends who are "half black/half "white"". ;) I guess it depends on what you consider a "race".


Well, a "mixed race" is just that. Two or more different races mixed. It's not specifically a black/white mix. It could be black/asian, or white/hispanic, or asian/middle eastern....there are infinite possibilities.

Wikipedia defines race as: ".....the categorization of humans into populations or ancestral groups on the basis of various sets of heritable characteristics.[1] The physical features commonly seen as indicating race are salient visual traits such as skin color, cranial or facial features and hair texture.[1][2] The concept of race may vary from country to country, changing according to specific cultures."

When I heard the theory of everyone becoming "tan" so to speak, they were saying that because it's so common for people to intermix now, and because lighter traits (like blonde or red hair or white skin) are more recessive, they feel like eventually, those recessive traits will just go away, and we'll be left with just the dominant ones which tend to be darker....like I said, brown skin, brown or black hair and dark eyes.

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#15 Emza

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 09:36 PM


I guess what I'm saying is that Nora's an American. Yes, she has Irish heritage, but she's still an American. She writes, mostly, for an American audience. The things that "bother" you (and believe me, I completely understand it :)), are things that most Americans believe to be part of the Irish "mystique" if that makes sense at all. She's paying serious homage to her heritage and your country. I've always thought it was pretty cool. :)


Well, yes and no...yes, Nora's American, but she's not completely ignorant to the Irish culture. You also have to mention that Nora has been to Ireland numerous times, and even owns property there. I imagine she has heard many native Irishmen talk, and I can only assume that she gets a lot of her dialogue from those travels to Ireland. I wouldn't imagine that she would be so careless as to use words and phrases that people don't really use there at all.

The problem I have is in people saying "We never do this" or "we never say that" because, maybe YOU don't, maybe nobody you know does, but that doesn't mean nobody does, period. As Shayde said, many of his Irish friends use those words, and you could probably look through Irish websites and forums and see those words used, too.

Same with the name Roarke. You can't say "We would say it O'Roarke" since there ARE people in Ireland with the last name Roarke. Many? I don't know. I haven't seen an Irish phone book recently, but you can search through Irish newspapers online and see that name pop up.

As to red hair, I found this little article on the "Irish Voice Newspaper" site which is a part of IrishAbroad.com:

THE future is bleak for the Irish colleen say experts this week – with the extinction of redheads in 100 years. Ireland's 320,000 natural redheads are the last of a dying breed according to scientists who say in a special report this week that too few people are now carrying the red hair gene for it to survive.

Ireland, because it has one of the highest percentage of redheads per head of population in the world, will prove to be the last place in the world to have redheads.

Red hair, say scientists in a report by the Oxford Hair Foundation, is in retreat because a maximum of just 4% of the world's population carry the gene.

Because the gene is recessive, it is diluted whenever carriers of the gene have children with people who have the stronger brown hair gene.

Dr. John Gray of the Oxford Hair Foundation said black and brown haired people are wiping out the red hair gene.

"The way things are going red hair will either be extremely rare or extinct by the end of the century," he said.



So there you go. I'm sure that, like Joe says, because Nora is American and writing for Americans, that can explain some discrepancies, but I don't know that you can say "We never" for most of them.

AJ



Too be honest, I'm astonished this got a reply O.o :blink: but anyway.
I see what you're saying AJ, But I'll rephrase what I was trying to say. I'm not saying those terms are NEVER used, but when they are it's mostly in Northern Ireland h is England technically but certainly not in DUBLIN Where Nora claims Roarke is from...

I'm not giving out, I'm just stating a fact, she gets English and Irish mixed up.

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This is the way the world ends
not with a bang but a whimper.”
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#16 elvan

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 11:05 PM

However, I can assure you, that while we DO have that accent, and we do use some of the phrases from that movie ("You Betcha" being the major one. ;)), it's not NEARLY as exaggerated as that. And also, we (and also the Canadians), I can assure you, do NOT use "Eh?" after every sentence. :P There's certain places that we use it.

We Canadians actually prefer the "You betcha, eh?" combo!! :lol:
(I do catch myself using eh? way too often...)

Joe is German and Dutch (actual Dutch, not Frisian. :lol:), with a tiny little bit of Spanish thrown in. I just think the whole thing is fun, in the USA, because so many of us are complete "mutts". :lol:


Yep, my dh's family too...the spanish had their fun with the dutch...his family came from the Brabent area near the Flemish border..half his cousins are blonde, half are dark..

His hair is "sandy blonde", but it's never darkened to the point of being a brunette.

And I imagine his hair lightens in the summer as well...my german roots have resulted in what I usually refer to as "shitty" blonde...but sandy sounds so much nicer! :P I always hate my first autumn haircut..when all my hard work and overexposure to the sun ends up lying on the salon floor! :(
With this weeks newspaper statistics on this very topic...something like 63% of the Toronto population will be a visible minority by 2020...so yeah..we're all going to be beige eventually...kind of like In Death in 2060..not really too worried about that actually.
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#17 BonnieR

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Posted 12 March 2010 - 11:06 PM

Too be honest, I'm astonished this got a reply O.o :blink: but anyway.
I see what you're saying AJ, But I'll rephrase what I was trying to say. I'm not saying those terms are NEVER used, but when they are it's mostly in Northern Ireland h is England technically but certainly not in DUBLIN Where Nora claims Roarke is from...

I'm not giving out, I'm just stating a fact, she gets English and Irish mixed up.

:eka:


The truth is, Nora is sometimes careless with details (e.g. putting Cornwall in the north of England), but then, another advantage of setting your story 50 years in the future is that things may have changed (welll, probably not that!).

And even now, some of us are pretty much "global" citizens, and we can be influenced by all sorts of things that aren't "native" to us. I read so many English books that I've got stuff in my vocabulary that's more English than American (chatting someone up, binning something, etc.) At the other end of the spectrum, most of my mom's family lives in a part of California where we pronounce "almond" to rhyme with "salmon" (no L sound and a short a); whereas Joe or Donna would probably say "we" do not pronounce it that way. My experience from working in the Irish embassy is that they call the native language "Irish," not Gaelic, but, again, maybe some people in Ireland do call it that; who knows?

An example that bugged me in Survivor is that she had the martial arts expert Li with a dojo in Japan. Now I think Li must be a Chinese name, as Japanese names in my experience are never only one syllable, and there are phonological reasons for that (not saying I couldn't be wrong), so you can say, well, maybe his parents were Chinese and they moved to Japan, or whatever. Just like in Casablanca they give the alleged Czech freedom fighter a Hungarian name--well, some etchnic Hungarians live in Czechoslovakia, or Romania, or Austria. So, it seems sloppy to me, but it could be explained away.

FWIW I say "bugger" and am almost as American as apple pie. ;-) AFAIK "shagging" is also English, but that doesn't mean an Irishman wouldn't say it.
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#18 AJ

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 12:40 AM

Too be honest, I'm astonished this got a reply O.o :blink: but anyway.
I see what you're saying AJ, But I'll rephrase what I was trying to say. I'm not saying those terms are NEVER used, but when they are it's mostly in Northern Ireland h is England technically but certainly not in DUBLIN Where Nora claims Roarke is from...

I'm not giving out, I'm just stating a fact, she gets English and Irish mixed up.

:eka:


The thing is though, if Irish natives say those things, then they do. It's not really a mix up. A lot of words and phrases that are said by Irish natives came from England...doesn't mean no Irish natives say them, even if they did start out being "British." All I'm saying is that it's possible she heard Irish natives saying those phrases when she was there, and that's where she picked them up. There was someone here once that said that Roarke would "never" say "yeah" basically claiming that Irish natives don't say that word. But, again, even if you're not a native of Ireland, you can still watch and/or read interviews done with Irish people, and I've heard them say "yeah" on occasion. So, even if you're a native of that country, it's hard to say.

Most people in DUBLIN might not say those phrases, but what if Roarke's dad wasn't originally from Dublin and he got those phrases from him? :dunno:

I had one person here once tell me that "nobody" in Dallas Texas here in the states speaks with what we would consider to be a "Texas" accent. She said she lives there and nobody she knew spoke with an accent. Yet, I've spoken to customers of my workplace who have shops in that area, and some of them do have a very distinct accent. So, much of it is just your own perceptions about things.

On the other hand, as Bonnie said, Nora does tend to be somewhat careless about some details, so, it's not impossible that she's made some mistakes here and there. I'm just making the point that it's hard to get very literal about things, and especially about this series.

AJ

#19 Donna

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 02:26 AM

I've actually read studies that say that it's possible that in a few hundred years, all people on earth will be "mixed race" and that there may be no "races" at all. Everyone will pretty much look the same: brown skin, dark hair and dark eyes.

AJ


Seems like, in the In Death books, there are many, many "mixed race" people. I think this would be a good thing.

What exactly are true blondes? People who were born with blonde hair and kept it as they grew older? Or just anyone born with blonde hair, regardless of whether it darkens as they age or not?

I think a "trur blond" is a born-blondie, regardless of how dark the hair gets.
I was born blond, my hair is still mostly a yellowish blond but is getting darker, especially the under layers. I think the part of my hair that sees the most sun stays the lightest.
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#20 IDFAN

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 02:27 AM

I'd say that the point of blended races could just as easily be made for blended language. Certainly there are American phrases that are bastardizations of European phrases, we could probably all sit here and name some. But then, with various forms of entertainment, whether it be music, plays, movies, entertainment news media, etc., everyone in the world will be using phrases from all parts of the globe. I can't remember now how many countries watched Bay Watch, but that had to have an impact on their language/culture. (I didn't say good impact :lol: ). Yes, I know that the show was translated, but there probably wasn't a word for surf board in the middle of the artic or savannah. I just think that this blending will continue so that by the time this series takes place, it will be unusual for people not to speak or understand one of maybe four 'main' languages. Also, there will probably fewer regional differences. If someone from Dallas and someone from Detroit both grew up watching the same television shows for 3-4 hours a day, don't you think they'd sound more alike than they would have before the advent of television? So, yes, Nora isn't always completely accurate. But, maybe her world isn't so far removed from reality.

And I really let down my species by not reproducing and passing on my red hair genes. Now I must go hang my head in shame. Bummer. My heritage is German/English on mom's side and Scotch/Irish from dad's side. I have been told I have 'Irish blue eyes', whatever that means. As to where the red hair comes from, Grandma was Irish and her hair was red, Grandpa was Scottish and his hair was blond. Mine is a mix - strawberry blond.

I read a headline the other day, but didn't get a chance to read the article stating that 'minority' births were just about to outdistance caucasian births. I'd say that has a lot to do with the blending of the races. In my family alone... All five of us kids had some shade of blond hair and blue eyes with light skin. My one sister married a caucasian and had four 'white' boys. Another sister married a mixed race man Japanese/Pacific Islander and had three tan skin/brown eyes/brown haired girls. My brother married a Filipina woman and had one girl and two boys, all tan skinned/brown eyed/brown haired. My youngest sister and I didn't have children. So, from five blond blue eyed offspring my mother had, only one carried on the blond haired/light skinned/blue eyed tradition. And BTW, my dad remarried and had a son and daughter with his Filipina wife and the two kids also were brown eyed/brown skinned/brown haired. So, just in my family, I can see the prediction AJ quoted as coming true.

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